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Adjunct

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Peter Arcese

Adjunct Professor
Peter Arcese is Professor and FRBC Chair in Applied Conservation Biology in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University British Columbia, and past Chair of the Nature Trust of BC. He has worked since 1980 on the ecology, genetics and conservation of plant, mammal and bird populations of the Pacific Northwest of North America, Africa and the Andes and contributed 3 books and >150 papers and book chapters on the ecology, evolution and conservation of terrestrial and marine species and ecosystems.  Peter maintains the world’s longest running study of a genetically-pedigreed wildlife population, is particularly skilled in the collection and analysis of empirical data, and design of monitoring programs and area-based conservation plans and policy.
 
Andrea

Andrea Dávalos

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Dr. Andrea Dávalos is an Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology in the Biological Sciences Department at SUNY Cortland. Her research focuses on the ecology and management of invasive species. She seeks to develop tools to assess the impacts of plant invasions and their management in the context of other co-occurring threats, such as white-tailed deer herbivory and invasive earthworms. Her current projects include documenting the distribution and impacts of Asian jumping worms; implementing and assessing of a biocontrol program for pale-swallow wort; and evaluating ecosystem responses to deer herbivory, nonnative earthworms and management of invasive pale-swallow wort. She works with land managers to coproduce ecological knowledge and provide information and tools to support conservation decisions. Andrea is passionate about mentoring undergraduate research and fostering diversity in the scientific community.
 

Shikui Dong

Adjunct Professor
Shikui Dong is a full Professor in Restoration Ecology at School of Environment, Beijing Normal University and Chair for the North East Asia Region of the Commission on Ecosystem Management of IUCN. He has conducted over 10 projects as PI or co-PIS from National Science Foundation of China (NSFC), Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of China, Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) of China and international funding resources such as Asian Scholarship Foundation (ASF) to examine the social-ecological systems for sustainable environments in mountainous regions of Western China and Hindu-Kush Himalayan Region of Asia since 1998. He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed papers, and 11 books on Ecological Restoration, Biodiversity Conservation, Natural Resources Management, and Sustainable Grazing etc. He has been teaching undergraduate level course of Restoration Ecology, and graduate level course of Ecological Restoration and International Conservation, as well as global seminar course of Environmental Sustainability. He was awarded as 10,000 Leading Researchers in China and Lecturer for National Outstanding Course Taught in English for Foreign Students in China. 
 
Thomas Elmqvist

Thomas Elmqvist

Adjunct Professor

Thomas Elmqvist, PhD, is a professor in Natural Resource Management at Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University. His research is focused on urbanization, urban ecosystem services, land use change, natural disturbances and components of resilience including the role of social institutions.
 
He has led the UN-initiated global project “Cities and Biodiversity Outlook” and more recently the Future Earth Project “Urban Planet” 
He currently serves as Editor in chief for the Nature Research journal “npj Urban Sustainability” and as associated editor for the journals Ecology and Society, Sustainability Science, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability and Global Sustainability.
 
He has received the Biodiversa prize 2018 for “Excellence in science and impact” and the ESA 2019 prize in “Sustainability Science”.
 
Brian Gratwicke

Brian Gratwicke

Adjunct Associate Professor
Brian Gratwicke leads the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute’s amphibian conservation program.  His research program is focused on finding way to mitigate the threat of chytridiomycosis, a devastating amphibian disease that has been implicated in the recent extinctions of amphibian species around the world.   Brian designed and spearheaded the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project that has facilities in Panama housing ex-situ assurance populations of 12 amphibian species in danger of extinction. 
Heidi Kretser

Heidi Kretser

Adjunct Associate Professor
Heidi Kretser incorporates tools and perspectives from the social sciences into applied conservation research, planning, practice, and decision-making. Heidi’s current projects include building constituents for conservation through creating effective communication that generates action on topics as varied as wildlife trafficking and white-nose syndrome in bats, devising strategies for reducing the impacts of private lands development and recreation on wildlife, and building collaborative approaches for increasing community and natural resource governance capacity that achieve conservation outcomes for wildlife while safeguarding human well-being across diverse constituents. Heidi is a Conservation Social Scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Global Conservation Program. She has worked with WCS in numerous capacities for over 20 years.
Jeff Milder

Jeffrey Milder

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Dr. Milder is an interdisciplinary conservation scientist whose work focuses on developing and evaluating cutting-edge strategies to improve the integration of food and fiber production, ecosystem conservation, and human wellbeing in rural landscapes. In his primary role as Chief Scientist at Rainforest Alliance, he works to develop science-based sustainability standards, programs, and strategies to support the organization’s mission of conserving biodiversity and improving livelihoods by transforming land use practices, business practices and consumer behavior.

J. Andrew Royle

Adjunct Professor
Dr. Royle is a Senior Scientist and Research Statistician at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) in Laurel, MD.  He has authored or co-authored 5 books and over 170 papers on statistical ecology including methodological developments and applications of statistics to problems in wildlife, ecology and natural resources. His work broadly encompasses elements of spatial statistics, hierarchical modeling and applied Bayesian analysis.  His current research is focused on modeling and estimation problems related to the use of new technologies such as bioacoustics, camera trapping and non-invasive genetics to study animal populations, communities and landscapes.  One area of work involves the integration of spatially explicit information into capture-recapture models in order to study spatial ecological processes such as connectivity and density.
 

Jennifer Seavey

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Jennifer Seavey is the Executive Director of Cornell’s Shoals Marine Laboratory. Dr. Seavey is a broadly trained ecologist whose work focuses on issues in seabird ecology, spatial ecology, marine science, and conservation biology. Dr. Seavey’s research examines the influence of anthropogenic environmental change on wildlife populations and ecosystem function. Over the last decade, she has studied how climate change, especially in combination with other anthropogenic stressors, influences coastal ecosystem function and threatened species conservation. Her current projects include seabird ecology and the conservation of endangered species in the fast changing Gulf of Maine. Dr. Seavey is also interested in science education methods and the role of the arts in enhancing science skills. More info about Shoals Marine Laboratory can be found at www.shoalsmarinelaboratory.org